A Million Trees


Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce

This article is courtesy of the Environmental Working Group.  Check them out at the link for Cosmetic Safety on my blog.  Angie

 Why Should You Care About Pesticides?

There is growing consensus in the scientific community that small doses of pesticides and other chemicals can adversely affect people, especially during vulnerable periods of fetal development and childhood when exposures can have long lasting effects. Because the toxic effects of pesticides are worrisome, not well understood, or in some cases completely unstudied, shoppers are wise to minimize exposure to pesticides whenever possible.

Will Washing and Peeling Help?

Nearly all of the data used to create these lists already considers how people typically wash and prepare produce (for example, apples are washed before testing, bananas are peeled). While washing and rinsing fresh produce may reduce levels of some pesticides, it does not eliminate them. Peeling also reduces exposures, but valuable nutrients often go down the drain with the peel. The best option is to eat a varied diet, wash all produce, and choose organic when possible to reduce exposure to potentially harmful chemicals.

How This Guide Was Developed

The produce ranking was developed by analysts at the not-for-profit Environmental Working Group (EWG) based on the results of nearly 43,000 tests for pesticides on produce collected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration between 2000 and 2005. A detailed description of the criteria used in developing the rankings is available as well as a full list of fresh fruits and vegetables that have been tested (see below).

EWG is a not-for-profit environmental research organization dedicated to improving public health and protecting the environment by reducing pollution in air, water and food. For more information please visit www.ewg.org.

The Full List: 43 Fruits & Veggies

RANK

FRUIT OR VEGGIE

SCORE

1 (worst)

Peaches

100 (highest pesticide load)

2

Apples

96

3

Sweet Bell Peppers

86

4

Celery

85

5

Nectarines

84

6

Strawberries

83

7

Cherries

75

8

Lettuce

69

9

Grapes – Imported

68

10

Pears

65

11

Spinach

60

12

Potatoes

58

13

Carrots

57

14

Green Beans

55

15

Hot Peppers

53

16

Cucumbers

52

17

Raspberries

47

18

Plums

46

19

Oranges

46

20

Grapes-Domestic

46

21

Cauliflower

39

22

Tangerine

38

23

Mushrooms

37

24

Cantaloupe

34

25

Lemon

31

26

Honeydew Melon

31

27

Grapefruit

31

28

Winter Squash

31

29

Tomatoes

30

30

Sweet Potatoes

30

31

Watermelon

25

32

Blueberries

24

33

Papaya

21

34

Eggplant

19

35

Broccoli

18

36

Cabbage

17

37

Bananas

16

38

Kiwi

14

39

Asparagus

11

40

Sweet Peas-Frozen

11

41

Mango

9

42

Pineapples

7

43

Sweet Corn-Frozen

2

44

Avocado

1

45 (best)

Onions

1 (lowest pesticide load)

Note: We ranked a total of 44 different fruits and vegetables but grapes are listed twice because we looked at both domestic and imported samples.

View Full Data Set

Creative Commons License Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce by Environmental Working Group is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.



Shaklee Spotlighted on Good Morning America
Shaklee recommended as a Career choice on National TV
GOOD MORNING AMERICA WORKPLACE EXPERT RECOMMENDS SHAKLEE AS SMART, FLEXIBLE CAREER CHOICE
750,000 Strong and Growing: Shaklee Helps Entrepreneurs Earn Income at Home  PLEASANTON, Calif. – July 13, 2007 – Good Morning America Workplace Contributor Tory Johnson introduced direct-selling to millions of viewers on Wednesday, July 12, with a segment explaining the ins-and-outs of the business. She highlighted Shaklee Corporation as a great partner for people considering direct-selling, with competitive start-up costs and a passionate sales force committed to environmentally friendly products and practices.“More than 14 million Americans have entrepreneurial careers through direct-selling,” says Laura Hughes, North American Sales. “At Shaklee, we believe that life should be full of “ands” – that it’s possible to have a great career and a fulfilling personal life. By working from home, Shaklee distributors have the flexibility – with the support of the company behind them – to create the type of business that is right for them, individually.”During the Good Morning America segment, Tory Johnson introduced some key considerations for those interested in a direct-selling career, including personality fit (are you outgoing, independent and motivated), product line (are you passionate about the products), business support (what does the company provide to help you succeed) and reasonable, affordable start-up costs.When green was just a color, Shaklee began making products that respected the earth and supported physical health. And since the company was founded, Shaklee has always believed sustainability began with people’s own lives. Shaklee products are sold by the people who use them, which means they enrich people’s lives and they earn income. The company’s peer-to-peer system has exponential rewards so that everybody gets a little more, including the benefits of the very best products produced in the most responsible ways.

Shaklee’s distributor starter kit is $39.95 and the company makes it very easy to launch each new business with a wide array of educational and marketing materials, training, support networks and personalized Web sites to generate online sales.
 
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About Shaklee Corporation
For 50 years, Shaklee has been a leading provider of premium quality, natural nutrition, and personal care products, environmentally-friendly household products, and state-of-the-art air and water treatment systems.  In 2000, Shaklee became the first company in the world to be Climate Neutral™ certified to totally offset its CO2 emissions, resulting in a net zero impact on the environment. With a robust product portfolio, including over 45 patents and patents pending worldwide, Shaklee has more than 750,000 Members and Distributors worldwide and operates in the U.S., Mexico, Canada, Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, and soon, in China.  For more information about Shaklee,   visit http://www.shaklee.net/upnorth .



Phone Books are so “2007”

A Green Tip for Today 

How many phone books do you need? Stop getting those bulky throwbacks by contacting the manufacturer (their contact information is usually listed on the phone book’s inside cover) and asking to be taken off their mailing list. Use online phonebooks or search the web to find what you need instead.

Think Reduce, Reuse, Recycle in 2008.

Courtesy of the The Green Life